View only selected parts of a molecule

Case number:699969-991159
Topic:General
Opened by:ptfrog
Status:Open
Type:Suggestion
Opened on:Sunday, November 27, 2011 - 04:32
Last modified:Friday, May 3, 2013 - 11:09

Guide puzzles would benefit from a "View Selection Only" feature. It would allow the user to hide most of a molecule, and see only the part that he or she is working on banding. Hidden portions would not be snapped to by the banding tool.

This would make banding to a guide immeasurably easier, without compromising the integrity of the process in any way.

Thanks.

(Sun, 11/27/2011 - 04:32  |  5 comments)


Joined: 09/22/2011
Groups: None

Are you familiar with the Shift + Q combination on segments, ptfrog?
(just a simple question, not trying to be condescending or anything like that...)

ptfrog's picture
User offline. Last seen 5 years 30 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 09/29/2011

Thank you, tristanlbailey. That does indeed make the process easier. I can still see a case to be made for "show selection," since it can also be used to good effect with discontinuous selections. It can allow the viewing / banding of segment sets that cannot be made co-planar.

But I can see that would help a great deal with the snap-to issue I raised in my initial post.

Joined: 09/22/2011
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I suppose it is still a good idea. Would it be a good idea to include some form of segment translucency to those segments that aren't selected (i.e see-through segments, but still visible enough to see)?

ptfrog's picture
User offline. Last seen 5 years 30 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 09/29/2011

I think that sounds like a very good idea. It would help the folder remain oriented to the larger picture. And if one could continue to select and unselect segments in this mode, that would allow for more efficient use of the tool.

Joined: 05/03/2013
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Doing that makes the analyses process sufficiently easy and the results are also much reliable that ways.

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