Idea for possible Covid-19 treatment

Case number:699969-2009585
Topic:General
Opened by:Mhg2020
Status:Open
Type:Suggestion
Opened on:Wednesday, April 29, 2020 - 18:32
Last modified:Wednesday, April 29, 2020 - 21:39

I will like to put this out there to fight COVID-19.
I am proposing an idea for a possible COVID-19 treatment of developing monoclonal antibodies from the most effective antibody studied from patients that recovered from COVID-19 in a three step process.
First research study of antibodies of subjects with prior infection of SARSCoV-2 in human cell culture infected with SARSCoV-2 in order to select the antibody that is most effective in binding to SARSCoV-2. This will assure that the monoclonal antibody produced will be an effective treatment.
Second the use of protein design to obtain the mRNA sequence of the idiotypes of the best antibody specific to SARSCoV-2 epitope that is obtained from antibody studies of survivors of COVID-19.
Third, obtaining the mRNA sequence for these precise antibodies can allow the production of monoclonal antibodies that can be used as treatment against COVID-19. I understand that this will require clinical trials to confirm safety and efficacy.
Certainly this process will take time and might not be necessary if an effective vaccine is obtained, but such treatment can be used on immunocompromised patients and if vaccine is not 100% effective. I believe we can save lives if we research this possible treatment option at the same time of vaccine trials and not wait to until the efficacy of the vaccine is known.

(Wed, 04/29/2020 - 18:32  |  1 comment)


spvincent's picture
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Joined: 12/07/2007
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I'm not qualified to comment on this but I suggest you check out recent entries on this drug discovery blog; particularly the most recent one on monoclonal antibodies.

https://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/

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