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Joined: 07/06/2020

Hello,

I am an educator and would love for my students use fold it but not have to download the program. Are there any puzzles they can complete online?

Thanks!

Brittany

LociOiling's picture
User offline. Last seen 6 hours 33 min ago. Offline
Joined: 12/27/2012
Groups: Beta Folders
lots of horsepower needed....

Foldit is "computationally intensive", so you really need a computer. It's also why the Foldit isn't available on phones, tablets, or even Chromebooks.

I don't know of an online equivalent to Foldit. You can *look* at proteins using online 3D viewers at rcsb.org (the main host of the Protein Data Bank, the PDB). There may be other similar viewers online, but they don't let you *do* anything with the protein, except spin it around.

You'll also find some good videos and other educational resources at rcsb.org that might be worthwhile. (I liked the video for aconitase working on citrate, watching it remove an H and and OH, then flipping the citrate over and adding an H and an OH in different spots.)

There are lots of online protein tools, but most of them are batch oriented, meaning you give them some input, hit enter, and then get results back later. Here's a list of protein analysis tools that I found. There's one called "MovieMaker" that seems interesting, but it gave me an unspecified "critical error" more less right away when I gave it a PDB entry.

There are at least two "volunteer computing" projects for proteins. Rosetta@home is associated with Foldit and the University of Washington. Somewhat confusingly, Folding@home is similar, but is associated with Washington University. Both these projects use your computer and go on your electric bill, and a software install is required, so not really what you're looking for.

Joined: 07/06/2020
Thank you so much for putting

Thank you so much for putting together all this info, this is really helpful!Thanks! :)

Susume's picture
User offline. Last seen 4 hours 34 min ago. Offline
Joined: 10/02/2011
Simpler simulations

There are some nice interactive 2D simulations that teach several principles of protein folding at http://mw.concord.org/nextgen/#interactives/biology/intermolecular-attractions-bio/protein-folding-bio

They don't have the 3D realism that foldit does, but they are well put together and get their ideas across.

Joined: 07/06/2020
Thank you!!! :)

Thank you!!! :)

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