Split display to show protein from more than one direction

Case number:845833-2005156
Topic:Game: Display
Opened by:jeff101
Status:Open
Type:Suggestion
Opened on:Saturday, May 5, 2018 - 02:00
Last modified:Wednesday, February 19, 2020 - 05:13

In the latest design puzzle, I've been trying to move part of the protein along a
certain axis. To monitor this motion, it would help to have the display split in two,
with each half of the display showing the protein from a different point of view.
For my case, having one view along the axis and another view perpendicular to this
same axis would be helpful. Having these different views update simultaneously as
the protein changes shape would also be helpful.

In drafting, one often shows the same object from three different directions all
perpendicular to each other. It would be nice if Foldit could do this too.

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/715227984542285720/ gives many examples while
https://rharmon.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/design-process-orthographic-views.jpg gives:

(Sat, 05/05/2018 - 02:00  |  13 comments)


jeff101's picture
User offline. Last seen 12 hours 5 min ago. Offline
Joined: 04/20/2012
Groups: Go Science

A related idea would be to have hotkeys (like the arrow keys on the keyboard)
that would rotate the protein about the x or y axes by 90 degrees.
If left-right on the display is the x axis and up-down is the y axis,
one could use the <- and -> arrows to rotate 90 degrees about the y axis,
and one could use the up and down arrows to rotate 90 degrees about the x axis.
Also, if the z axis is in & out of the display, one could use the page-up
& page-down keys to rotate the protein 90 degrees about the z axis
(this would be like rotating the display clockwise or counterclockwise).

The simpler the hotkeys, the more quickly we can switch the protein view.

jeff101's picture
User offline. Last seen 12 hours 5 min ago. Offline
Joined: 04/20/2012
Groups: Go Science

Restating the above, if the view
began with the front of the protein,
pressing the right-arrow (->) key repeatedly
would change the view from front to right-side
to back to left-side to front.

Pressing the left-arrow (<-) key repeatedly
would change the view from front to left-side
to back to right-side to front.

Pressing the up-arrow key repeatedly
would change the view from front to top
to back (upside-down) to bottom to front.

Pressing the down-arrow key repeatedly
would change the view from front to bottom
to back (upside-down) to top to front.

Pressing the Page-Up key would rotate
the front view of the protein 90 degrees
clockwise.

Pressing the Page-Down key would rotate
the front view of the protein 90 degrees
counterclockwise.

Susume's picture
User offline. Last seen 2 hours 40 min ago. Offline
Joined: 10/02/2011

I love this hotkey idea for 90 degree rotation in 3 dimensions. Currently, one can drag to rotate, but you're only guessing how far you've turned, and there is no way then to rotate back to exactly the previous viewpoint. Quick and easy 90 degree rotations would fix that.

bkoep's picture
User offline. Last seen 2 days 10 hours ago. Offline
Joined: 11/15/2012
Groups: None

This is a cool idea! I could imagine complications from splitting the screen that would require some serious code changes; but I think a hotkey for 90 degree rotations would be much more feasible.

jeff101's picture
User offline. Last seen 12 hours 5 min ago. Offline
Joined: 04/20/2012
Groups: Go Science

I suppose you could have a slider in addition to the hotkeys.
The slider would adjust how big the angle increments should be.
The default value could be 90 degrees, but folks might want
to do smaller angle increments like 30 or 45 degrees instead.

Joined: 09/24/2012
Groups: Go Science

More generic: split display in order to view something else in a smaller window.

This would be very useful for ED puzzle:

-shift-Q on the main window
-q on the smaller one (in order to keep the global view)

I can imagine a lot of other applications, selecting a view for the main window and another view settings for the second one.

CAN1958's picture
User offline. Last seen 2 hours 3 min ago. Offline
Joined: 10/22/2019
Groups: None

For my self I could see it helpful in regard of having about 10 degrees difference preferably having the option of putting the selected angle in the window you want so I would set it to see 3D Cross Viewing of the protein but still I would be able to look at it even if they would be placed non crossing viewing but for my self it be easier then imaging to look thru the screen as if it was a clear window, while crossing is easier to think of a fly is coming wright at your nose from the screen and your reflex trying to look at it and suddenly seeing the 3D combine angles. I already did a few double picture of the fold it screen and quiet a beautiful 3D experience to see.

CAN1958's picture
User offline. Last seen 2 hours 3 min ago. Offline
Joined: 10/22/2019
Groups: None

http://fold.it/portal/files/Collagen2b.png

here is an example cross viewing, just concentrate on the black dot until you combine dots together and "voila". enjoy. I like to torture your eyes muscles. :-)

CAN1958's picture
User offline. Last seen 2 hours 3 min ago. Offline
Joined: 10/22/2019
Groups: None

http://fold.it/portal/files/NotInNature.png

If you were able to see the previous 3D here is another one to really refine your skill.

I know for myself I even be able to work 3D on split screens, there is a few cartoons on the net of a roller coaster ride twin films aside, that I was able to look at it all the way, but sometimes in a curve I will admit that I lost the 3D.

For me size doesn't matter even those example on a 28" screen, but to start you should try a smaller size.

CAN1958's picture
User offline. Last seen 2 hours 3 min ago. Offline
Joined: 10/22/2019
Groups: None
jeff101's picture
User offline. Last seen 12 hours 5 min ago. Offline
Joined: 04/20/2012
Groups: Go Science

Sort of related to the above view options would be
to have Fixed, Rotating, and Rocking view options.

Fixed - Like the present protein view.

Rotating - If you drag on the protein a certain
way, the protein will start rotating in that
direction and continue doing so until you make
it rotate a different direction or switch back
to the Fixed view option. The amount you drag
on the protein decides how fast it rotates.

Rocking - This is a bit like Rotating in that
the direction and amount you drag the protein
sets which direction and how fast it starts moving.
After that, the motion is like a rotation that slows
down, then reverses direction, then speeds up, then
slows down again, then reverses direction again, etc.
Mathematically, it would have an axis of rotation
and there would be an angle phi about this axis of
rotation. phi would start at 0 degrees and obey a
sine function so that phi=A*sin(omega*t). A tells
the amplitude of the rocking (phi would range from
-A to +A), and omega tells how fast the rocking
occurs (larger omega rocks faster). In any event,
the rocking would continue until you switched
back to a Fixed view or dragged on the protein
again to set a new rocking speed and direction.

It would be nice if the above views would continue
and could be changed, even while Recipes run. I
think the Rotating and Rocking views would help us
see the 3D nature of our proteins better.

jeff101's picture
User offline. Last seen 12 hours 5 min ago. Offline
Joined: 04/20/2012
Groups: Go Science

With moving view options like Rotating or Rocking,
as above, players might want to send short gif
movies to each other instead of screenshots.
Perhaps let the camera icons inside Foldit chat
convert to video icons. Maybe click the video icon
once to start recording and then again to quit.

Each gif filename could include the # of frames
in its movie. This would help other players know
how long a movie is before clicking on it.

agcohn821's picture
User offline. Last seen 10 hours 8 min ago. Offline
Joined: 11/05/2019
Groups: None

Great idea!

Hey Jeff101--these are great suggestions!

Sitemap

Developed by: UW Center for Game Science, UW Institute for Protein Design, Northeastern University, Vanderbilt University Meiler Lab, UC Davis
Supported by: DARPA, NSF, NIH, HHMI, Amazon, Microsoft, Adobe, RosettaCommons